Species: 

Dysphania ambrosioides

Common Name: 

Mexican tea

Systems Affected (standardized): 

disturbed/waste areas, forest/woodland, cropland/pastureland

Regions(s) present (updated by AB): 

NE, SE

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Impacts: 

Impact outcomes
Altered trophic level
Damaged ecosystem services
Ecosystem change/ habitat alteration
Loss of medicinal resources
Modification of successional patterns
Monoculture formation
Negatively impacts agriculture
Negatively impacts animal health
Reduced native biodiversity
Threat to/ loss of native species
Negatively impacts animal/plant collections
Damages animal/plant products
Impact mechanisms
Causes allergic responses
Competition - monopolizing resources
Pest and disease transmission
Hybridization
Poisoning
Rapid growth

Source? likely to be reintroduced: 

D. ambrosioides has been intentionally introduced in many tropical and subtropical regions to be used as a culinary and aromatic herb, tea, food commodity, to extract essential oils and as a medicinal plant. It has escaped from cultivation and spreads rapidly into disturbed areas, secondary forests, and agricultural lands where it behaves as a weed (Park et al., 2012; Randall, 2012; Prota4U, 2013: USDA-ARS, 2013). Considering that this species can produce thousands of seeds which can be easily dispersed by both biotic and abiotic seed dispersal vectors, the probability of invasion remains high principally in areas near its cultivation (PIER, 2013; USDA-ARS, 2013).

Info Blurb: 

Spreads rapidly into disturbed areas, secondary forests, and agricultural areas. Can form monocultures, altering habitats and reducing biodiversity. Is an allergen. Intentionally introduced as a culinary herb and as a medicinal plant. Can produce thousands of seeds which are easily dispersed.

Native Regions in OK: 

NONE

Current and past designations: 

BS

Present in OK?

Yes

Present in Bordering States?

TX, NM, KS, MO, AR, LA

Has Legal Status in BS?

NONE